Ukiyo-e :.

Ukiyo-e

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Overview and quickfacts

Ukiyo-e is a Japanese art style that emerged in the late 1600s. It is characterized by its woodblock prints and paintings of everyday life, often with an element of humor or satire. Ukiyo-e reached the height of its popularity in the 1800s, and its influence can still be seen in modern Japanese art and culture.

The art style is also known as: Japanese woodblock prints
Categories: Impressionism, Modernism

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1. The Great Wave off Kanagawa, Katsushika Hokusai, 1829-1833 2. The Sudden Shower over the Great River, Katsushika Hokusai, 1832 3. Red and White Plum Blossoms, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 4. Snow at Kanbara, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 5. The Pine Wind at Matsushima, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1834 6. The Moon over Mount Fuji, Katsushika Hokusai, 1834 7. The Rainbow at Shijo Bridge, Katsushika Hokusai, 1835 8. The Plum Orchard at Kameido, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1835 9. The Great Wave off Kanagawa (The Great Wave), Katsushika Hokusai, 1829-1833 10. The Sudden Shower over the Great River (The Sudden Shower), Katsushika Hokusai, 1832 11. Red and White Plum Blossoms (Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 12. Snow at Kanbara (Kanbara no Yuki), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 13. The Pine Wind at Matsushima (Matsushima no Kaze), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1834 14. The Moon over Mount Fuji (Fuji no Tsuki), Katsushika Hokusai, 1834 15. The Rainbow at Shijo Bridge (Shijo no Niji), Katsushika Hokusai, 1835 16. The Plum Orchard at Kameido (Kameido no Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1835 17. The Great Wave off Kanagawa (The Great Wave), Katsushika Hokusai, 1829-1833 18. The Sudden Shower over the Great River (The Sudden Shower), Katsushika Hokusai, 1832 19. Red and White Plum Blossoms (Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 20. Snow at Kanbara (Kanbara no Yuki), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 21. The Pine Wind at Matsushima (Matsushima no Kaze), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1834 22. The Moon over Mount Fuji (Fuji no Tsuki), Katsushika Hokusai, 1834 23. The Rainbow at Shijo Bridge (Shijo no Niji), Katsushika Hokusai, 1835 24. The Plum Orchard at Kameido (Kameido no Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1835 25. The Great Wave off Kanagawa (The Great Wave), Katsushika Hokusai, 1829-1833 26. The Sudden Shower over the Great River (The Sudden Shower), Katsushika Hokusai, 1832 27. Red and White Plum Blossoms (Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 28. Snow at Kanbara (Kanbara no Yuki), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 29. The Pine Wind at Matsushima (Matsushima no Kaze), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1834 30. The Moon over Mount Fuji (Fuji no Tsuki), Katsushika Hokusai, 1834

Detailed Description

Ukiyo-e is a Japanese art style that emerged in the late 1600s. The term ukiyo-e translates to “pictures of the floating world.” Ukiyo-e artists were known for their woodblock prints and paintings of everyday life, including kabuki actors, geishas, and landscapes. One of the most famous ukiyo-e artists is Katsushika Hokusai, who is best known for his woodblock print series Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji. Other notable ukiyo-e artists include Utagawa Hiroshige and Kitagawa Utamaro. Ukiyo-e was popularized in the West in the late 1800s by artists such as Vincent van Gogh and Claude Monet, who were both influenced by Japanese art. Today, ukiyo-e is considered one of the most important art styles in Japanese history.

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Known Paintings / Pictures / Images

1. The Great Wave off Kanagawa, Katsushika Hokusai, 1829-1833 2. The Sudden Shower over the Great River, Katsushika Hokusai, 1832 3. Red and White Plum Blossoms, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 4. Snow at Kanbara, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 5. The Pine Wind at Matsushima, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1834 6. The Moon over Mount Fuji, Katsushika Hokusai, 1834 7. The Rainbow at Shijo Bridge, Katsushika Hokusai, 1835 8. The Plum Orchard at Kameido, Utagawa Hiroshige, 1835 9. The Great Wave off Kanagawa (The Great Wave), Katsushika Hokusai, 1829-1833 10. The Sudden Shower over the Great River (The Sudden Shower), Katsushika Hokusai, 1832 11. Red and White Plum Blossoms (Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 12. Snow at Kanbara (Kanbara no Yuki), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 13. The Pine Wind at Matsushima (Matsushima no Kaze), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1834 14. The Moon over Mount Fuji (Fuji no Tsuki), Katsushika Hokusai, 1834 15. The Rainbow at Shijo Bridge (Shijo no Niji), Katsushika Hokusai, 1835 16. The Plum Orchard at Kameido (Kameido no Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1835 17. The Great Wave off Kanagawa (The Great Wave), Katsushika Hokusai, 1829-1833 18. The Sudden Shower over the Great River (The Sudden Shower), Katsushika Hokusai, 1832 19. Red and White Plum Blossoms (Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 20. Snow at Kanbara (Kanbara no Yuki), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 21. The Pine Wind at Matsushima (Matsushima no Kaze), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1834 22. The Moon over Mount Fuji (Fuji no Tsuki), Katsushika Hokusai, 1834 23. The Rainbow at Shijo Bridge (Shijo no Niji), Katsushika Hokusai, 1835 24. The Plum Orchard at Kameido (Kameido no Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1835 25. The Great Wave off Kanagawa (The Great Wave), Katsushika Hokusai, 1829-1833 26. The Sudden Shower over the Great River (The Sudden Shower), Katsushika Hokusai, 1832 27. Red and White Plum Blossoms (Ume), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 28. Snow at Kanbara (Kanbara no Yuki), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1833 29. The Pine Wind at Matsushima (Matsushima no Kaze), Utagawa Hiroshige, 1834 30. The Moon over Mount Fuji (Fuji no Tsuki), Katsushika Hokusai, 1834

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So what does the future hold for humans and machines? It is likely that both humans and machines will continue to play important roles in the future. Machines will become increasingly capable and will be used for tasks that are too difficult or time-consuming for humans. Humans, on the other hand, will continue to provide the important advantages of empathy, common sense, adaptation, and creativity. As a result, the future looks bright for both humans and machines.

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It’s possible that we’ll find a way to coexist with intelligent machines. We might, for example, use them to do the boring and dangerous jobs that we don’t want to do. We could also use them to augment our own intelligence, making us smarter and more productive. But it’s also possible that AI will eventually outcompete us, leading to our extinction. After all, if intelligent machines can do everything we can do, but better, then why would anyone want to keep us around? Only time will tell what the future of human-AI relations will be. But one thing is certain: the rise of artificial intelligence presents a grave threat to the future of humanity.

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