Abstract Expressionism :.

Abstract Expressionism

Outline:

Overview and quickfacts

Abstract Expressionism is a post-World War II art movement in American painting, developed in New York City in the 1940s. It was the first specifically American movement to achieve international influence and put New York City at the center of the art world, a role formerly occupied by Paris. Although the term “abstract expressionism” was first applied to American art in 1946 by the art critic Robert Coates, it had been first used in Germany in 1919 in the magazine Der Sturm, regarding German Expressionism.

The art style is also known as: Non-representational art, Action painting, Gestural abstraction, Color Field painting, Lyrical Abstraction, Abstract Impressionism, Neo-Expressionism
Categories: Impressionism, Modernism

1. Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) 2. Willem de Kooning (1904-1997) 3. Mark Rothko (1903-1970) 4. Clyfford Still (1904-1980) 5. Barnett Newman (1905-1970) 6. Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) 7. Arshile Gorky (1904-1948) 8. Franz Kline (1910-1962) 9. Lee Krasner (1908-1984) 10. Robert Motherwell (1915-1991) 11. Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993) 12. Helen Frankenthaler (1928-1997) 13. Joan Mitchell (1925-1992) 14. Clyfford Still (1904-1980) 15. Barnett Newman (1905-1970) 16. Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) 17. Arshile Gorky (1904-1948) 18. Franz Kline (1910-1962) 19. Lee Krasner (1908-1984) 20. Robert Motherwell (1915-1991) 21. Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993) 22. Helen Frankenthaler (1928-1997) 23. Joan Mitchell (1925-1992) 24. Philip Guston (1913-1980) 25. Edward Hopper (1882-1967) 26. Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) 27. Stuart Davis (1892-1964) 28. John Sloan (1871-1951) 29. Reginald Marsh (1898-1954) 30. Ben Shahn (1898-1969)

1. “Action Painting” by Jackson Pollock (1952) 2. “The Blue Room” by Mark Rothko (1949) 3. “Brown and Black” by Clyfford Still (1951) 4. “Canyon” by Barnett Newman (1949) 5. “Convergence” by Jackson Pollock (1952) 6. “Easter and the Totem” by Barnett Newman (1953) 7. “Enchanted Forest” by Mark Rothko (1958) 8. “Freeform” by Clyfford Still (1957) 9. “Golden Wall” by Jackson Pollock (1949) 10. “Gray” by Clyfford Still (1948) 11. “Green” by Mark Rothko (1949) 12. “Hiroshima” by Barnett Newman (1946) 13. “I and the Village” by Mark Rothko (1951) 14. “Improvisation 28” by Jackson Pollock (1950) 15. “Number 1A” by Clyfford Still (1948) 16. “Number 31” by Jackson Pollock (1950) 17. “One” by Clyfford Still (1951) 18. “Orange” by Mark Rothko (1956) 19. “Painting” by Jackson Pollock (1948) 20. “Pink and Black” by Clyfford Still (1957) 21. “Red” by Mark Rothko (1949) 22. “Red, Black, and Blue” by Clyfford Still (1957) 23. “Shimmering Substance” by Jackson Pollock (1946) 24. “Slow Swirl by the Edge of the Sea” by Jackson Pollock (1947) 25. “Summertime” by Clyfford Still (1955) 26. “Untitled” by Clyfford Still (1957) 27. “Untitled” by Mark Rothko (1953) 28. “Untitled” by Barnett Newman (1950) 29. “Untitled” by Jackson Pollock (1951) 30. “White” by Clyfford Still (1951)

Detailed Description

Abstract expressionism is a post–World War II art movement in American painting, developed in New York in the 1940s. It was the first specifically American movement to achieve international influence and put New York City at the center of the western art world, a role formerly filled by Paris. Although the term “abstract expressionism” was first applied to American art in 1946 by the art critic Robert Coates, it had been first used in Germany in 1919 in the magazine Der Sturm, regarding German Expressionism. In the United States, Alfred Barr was the first to use this term in 1929 in relation to works by Wassily Kandinsky. An important predecessor is surrealism, with its emphasis on automatic, or subconscious creation. The term “action painting” is often used to describe the style, since painters working in this style often painted using bold gestures that left visible marks. The resulting work often emphasized the physical act of painting itself as an essential aspect of the finished work or concern of its artist. The movement places a high value on spontaneity, as painters working in this style sought to capture the unpredictable and ephemeral nature of their own emotions in their work. In order to capture these emotions on canvas, many artists working in this style used unusual and experimental techniques, such as dripping, pouring, and splattering paint onto their canvases. Some of the most famous and influential artists associated with this movement include Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman, Clyfford Still, Willem de Kooning, and Franz Kline. These artists created some of the most iconic and well-known paintings of the 20th century, such as Pollock’s “Number 1, 1948” and Rothko’s “Untitled (Black on Maroon),” which are both currently on view at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Visual Examples from our image gallery

Coming soon

TOOLs

Artists and Paintings

Known Artists

1. Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) 2. Willem de Kooning (1904-1997) 3. Mark Rothko (1903-1970) 4. Clyfford Still (1904-1980) 5. Barnett Newman (1905-1970) 6. Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) 7. Arshile Gorky (1904-1948) 8. Franz Kline (1910-1962) 9. Lee Krasner (1908-1984) 10. Robert Motherwell (1915-1991) 11. Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993) 12. Helen Frankenthaler (1928-1997) 13. Joan Mitchell (1925-1992) 14. Clyfford Still (1904-1980) 15. Barnett Newman (1905-1970) 16. Adolph Gottlieb (1903-1974) 17. Arshile Gorky (1904-1948) 18. Franz Kline (1910-1962) 19. Lee Krasner (1908-1984) 20. Robert Motherwell (1915-1991) 21. Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993) 22. Helen Frankenthaler (1928-1997) 23. Joan Mitchell (1925-1992) 24. Philip Guston (1913-1980) 25. Edward Hopper (1882-1967) 26. Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) 27. Stuart Davis (1892-1964) 28. John Sloan (1871-1951) 29. Reginald Marsh (1898-1954) 30. Ben Shahn (1898-1969)

Known Paintings / Pictures / Images

1. “Action Painting” by Jackson Pollock (1952) 2. “The Blue Room” by Mark Rothko (1949) 3. “Brown and Black” by Clyfford Still (1951) 4. “Canyon” by Barnett Newman (1949) 5. “Convergence” by Jackson Pollock (1952) 6. “Easter and the Totem” by Barnett Newman (1953) 7. “Enchanted Forest” by Mark Rothko (1958) 8. “Freeform” by Clyfford Still (1957) 9. “Golden Wall” by Jackson Pollock (1949) 10. “Gray” by Clyfford Still (1948) 11. “Green” by Mark Rothko (1949) 12. “Hiroshima” by Barnett Newman (1946) 13. “I and the Village” by Mark Rothko (1951) 14. “Improvisation 28” by Jackson Pollock (1950) 15. “Number 1A” by Clyfford Still (1948) 16. “Number 31” by Jackson Pollock (1950) 17. “One” by Clyfford Still (1951) 18. “Orange” by Mark Rothko (1956) 19. “Painting” by Jackson Pollock (1948) 20. “Pink and Black” by Clyfford Still (1957) 21. “Red” by Mark Rothko (1949) 22. “Red, Black, and Blue” by Clyfford Still (1957) 23. “Shimmering Substance” by Jackson Pollock (1946) 24. “Slow Swirl by the Edge of the Sea” by Jackson Pollock (1947) 25. “Summertime” by Clyfford Still (1955) 26. “Untitled” by Clyfford Still (1957) 27. “Untitled” by Mark Rothko (1953) 28. “Untitled” by Barnett Newman (1950) 29. “Untitled” by Jackson Pollock (1951) 30. “White” by Clyfford Still (1951)

Additional Ressources, Links directly pointing to landing pages and so on.

AI ART RESSOURCES


Helping tools -> predefined search links on other pages:



Information around Art created with and by AI. Human in the loop, or human out of the loop. Everything possible.



Created:

Updated:


ai-thoughts (1) DALLE2 (1) DALLEANDME (1) Fun (2) future (1) humans (1) MEANDDALLE (1) openai (1) prognosis (1) technlogy (1)

The Art of AI



The Art of AI Website


Art generated and/or created by human intelligience, this is what this webpage is about.

Information around the art of AI, projects, finds, help, tips and insights collected on the way.

Results and snapshots of an ongoing project.

The positive Future

What an AI system (OpenAI – textdavinci002) tells us about a positive future of humans and AI:

So what does the future hold for humans and machines? It is likely that both humans and machines will continue to play important roles in the future. Machines will become increasingly capable and will be used for tasks that are too difficult or time-consuming for humans. Humans, on the other hand, will continue to provide the important advantages of empathy, common sense, adaptation, and creativity. As a result, the future looks bright for both humans and machines.

System response / 27.11.2022

The Negative Futrue

What an AI system (OpenAI – textdavinci002) tells us about a negative future of humans and AI:

It’s possible that we’ll find a way to coexist with intelligent machines. We might, for example, use them to do the boring and dangerous jobs that we don’t want to do. We could also use them to augment our own intelligence, making us smarter and more productive. But it’s also possible that AI will eventually outcompete us, leading to our extinction. After all, if intelligent machines can do everything we can do, but better, then why would anyone want to keep us around? Only time will tell what the future of human-AI relations will be. But one thing is certain: the rise of artificial intelligence presents a grave threat to the future of humanity.

System response / 27.11.2022